Commercial Aviation, Technology, The News Hub

Advances in Aviation

Not Your Typical Airplane

New technologies are replacing conventional aircraft manufacturing processes.

(photo source: BBC)

NEW POST on The News Hub!!

A look at two new technological advances taking place in the aviation industry right now! Super cool!

To read this new article, click HERE.

Help me get paid for this article by reading, up voting & sharing with your friends!!

To read all my posts on The News Hub, click HERE.

xoxo Chrissi

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Commercial Aviation, Safety, The News Hub

Jet Suicides: Weighing in on the safety of Commercial Aviation

New post on The News Hub!

“New Information on Germanwings Crash starts a Media Firestorm”

Reality: statistically nearly impossible to die in a ‘jet suicide’

(Photo Source: NY Post)
The media has been ablaze with information that copilot of Germanwings 9525, Andreas Lubitz likely practiced his controlled descent into terrain on the outbound leg to Barcelona prior to the successful crash into the French Alps on March 24.
The French Civil Aviation Safety Authority has released information indicating that on the previous leg, the copilot was alone in the flight deck and set the selected altitude to descend to 100 when he was cleared to 35 thousand feet. This occurred again when he was cleared to 21 thousand feet. This data suggests he was either practicing his maneuver for the return flight or attempted to crash on the first leg but abandoned his plan. The report also confirms that Lubitz’s mental health was questioned in the past, although later approved with restrictions.
To continue reading, please view the original post on The News Hub.
To read my other stories about Germanwings 9525 and other aviation-related posts on The News Hub, click HERE.
(Side Note:  Thank you everyone for the great response to yesterday’s post! Welcome to all the new followers that are now watching this mess of a journey unfold! Thank you to everyone that’s been watching thus far. I think my writer’s block is finally dissipating and new stories should be coming soon!)
Thanks for following along!!
xo Chrissi
Many people that know I have an aviation background ask me (and I’ve written on this topic before): is flying safe? My simple answer: absolutely.
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Aviation, Flying, General Aviation, My Journey, Philanthropy, Published Articles, The News Hub

Thousands of Animals get a Second Chance at Life

Pilots volunteer time and resources to save animals doomed for euthanasia

(Originally posted on The News Hub, To see the full article w/ featured photos, please follow the link to The News Hub)

“On any given day – between our two shelters in town – we have 15,000 dogs available for adoption,” said the ground volunteer I was taking dogs from in Anderson, South Carolina. We were transporting just 13 of the 15,000 in Anderson – hoping and praying we could somehow make a difference and save them from the gas-chamber euthanasia so many of their fellow shelter mates would soon face.

I was volunteering alongside my pilot dad and animal-loving mom in conjunction with organizations like Animal Rescue Flights (ARF) and Pilots N’ Paws (PNP). We were tasked with transporting animals from shelters that had an overabundance of animals to “forever homes” and shelters in other areas of the country where the animals have a better chance of being adopted.

According to the ASPCA, 3.9 million dogs and 3.4 million cats are placed into animal shelters every year in the United States. In some areas, upwards of 70 percent of those placed into shelters are euthanized. On average, only 35 percent of those placed into shelters are adopted.

Organizations like PNP and ARF are helping change these statistics by moving animals from overcrowded shelters to high-demand shelters where they have a chance of being adopted or have already been adopted by a “forever family” – they just need a way to get there.

“I was looking for meaningful ways to share flying with others,” said volunteer pilot Roxanne Parker who fell in love with animal transports after her first trip with Blue – a giant but gentle Pit Bull – to his forever home. “He slept during most of the flight, and casually looked out the window as any airline passenger would when we took off and landed,” she said.

“A friend of mine flew for [PNP] and told me about how much he enjoyed it,” said volunteer pilot Ryan McCormick. So McCormick and some of his friends began flying missions throughout the southeast. McCormick has successfully completed 10 rescue flights and has saved more than 25 dogs in the process.

PNP and ARF are just two of many 501c3 charitable organizations that have successfully used air and ground transports to save thousands of animals from euthanasia. The two organizations have relocated more than 75,000 animals since 2008.

Pilots do not receive any compensation for their time, fuel or operating costs. However, if they coordinate their flight through a 501c3 organization, they are eligible for a tax deduction.

“I’m up to 1813 animals transported now,” said Jeff Luizza, volunteer pilot who said he is currently not flying for a specific rescue organization but has in the past. “I got into it as an offshoot of flying sick kids. The liability got to high for flying the kids and moved into the shelter animals about ten years ago,” he said.

“[I’ve] lost count of how many specific rescue missions I’ve done, but it’s quite a lot,” said John Hayes, flight instructor and volunteer pilot. He has joined Luizza on rescue flights since last fall. “We move quite a bit of dogs,” he said.

Dogs aren’t the only animals flown during these missions. Some of the animals transported by PNP and ARF over the years include: dogs, cats, pigs, reptiles, and rabbits – just to name a few. “Two weeks ago we flew a new born Chimpanzee,” said Luizza.

Hayes and Luizza fly Luizza’s Beechcraft KingAir turboprop on most of their rescue trips. “We’ve had upwards of 50 dogs on flights before, sometimes more than [one flight] in a weekend,” said Hayes.

“To see the faces on the people when we hand over the pups,” is the best part according to Luizza, “it’s fun.”

But transport organizations are key to only one portion of stopping injustices to animals. How can you help?

“Please spay or neuter your pets.” – Bob Barker

The largest way you can help is by adopting pets that are currently in shelters. Buying pets from pet stores or breeders is simply encouraging the overbreeding and overpopulation problem. There are animals in shelters waiting for homes that will be euthanized if they don’t find homes soon.

If you cannot adopt but have extra room, volunteer through a rescue organization to foster pets in your home for a period of time.

(Photo courtesy of Ryan McCormick)

If you can’t have pets in your home then donate food, supplies or money to a local shelter or rescue organization. Did you know that one of the largest things shelters need right now is clean towels and bleach?

If you don’t have the means to donate then volunteer your time! Animals in shelters would love your attention for the afternoon. “[Working] with animal transport organizations is a wonderful way to use your time and knowledge to help others,” said Parker.

“The pilots get all the credit in PNP, but all we do is fly, which as pilots is already something we love,” said McCormick. “It’s the people on the ground that schedule these trips, foster the dogs, and contact the pilots that deserve the credit. [It’s] been incredible to work with them.”

If you can’t volunteer then please educate others. Share this post with your friends. Support local rescue groups and promote what they’re doing in the community. Let your colleagues know what they can do to help. Speak up for those that don’t have a voice.

 

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Aviation, Corporate Aviation, Other Publications, Published Articles

My name in print!

With the craziness of moving and recently being picked up by The News Hub I realized that completely forgot to mention an article that I had published while at the 26th Annual Women in Aviation Conference!

The first day I was there, I volunteered in the Press Room. When I arrived, I was immediately put on assignment to write a story about Walmart Aviation and how the WAI Conference helped many of them gain employment with Walmart Aviation. I was humbled that they would give me a task so large and quickly got to work. A few things that I learned was 1) I should always write down my interview questions before I go to interview people and 2) also remember to get everyone’s full names that are involved with the story. I had to go back a few times to gather up loose-ends, but it’s always a learning experience right? I was honored to be featured in their daily conference magazine that’s distributed to all the attendees every morning: “The Daily.” This was the FIRST print article that I had published, it was very surreal to see my name physically printed in front of me. (And it also gave me great credibility when approaching magazines offering my freelance services!).  Thank you Women in Aviation for supporting me & my endeavors to becoming a published author!!! This is just one step on the journey for me!

Without further ramblings… here’s my words in print for the first time! (The first page is just the cover, the second below the picture is where you can check out my article!

WAI Daily March 7 2015 | Cover | CulverWAI Daily Saturday March 7 2015 | Walmart Aviation | Culver

As always, thank you for following my journey.

xoxo Chrissi

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Published Articles, Technology, The News Hub

Not so much Aviation… But still journalism!

So yesterday I had a request to cover this nifty new battery that some Stanford researchers developed for The News Hub… wasn’t quite sure it was my cup of tea but it was actually quite interesting! You should check it out here!

Looks like at least one of my posts will reach enough views to get me paid this month! #progress!!

Thanks for following!

xoxo Chrissi

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Aviation, Commercial Aviation, Published Articles, Safety, The News Hub

Branching Out!

Hello everyone!

No I haven’t fallen off the face of the planet – Just been busy getting ready for the big move to OKC next week & saying my goodbyes to all my GREAT friends here in Daytona!

I have lots of stories in the works from the WAI conference BUT!!! News never stops (even for my lagging in transcriptions) therefore a news story literally FELL into my hands today and I just HAD to put it to the top of my to-do list and write about it RIGHT THIS SECOND.

An editor of The News Hub found my blog & Facebook page and asked me to write a news style article for them about Germanwings 9525…

So that’s what I did.

I always feel terrible writing when tragedy strikes, but as a journalist it literally is my job to keep people informed. So without further rambling… here is my latest published article about Germanwings 9525. #InDeepSorrow

https://www.the-newshub.com/international/germanwings-9525-no-survivors-after-rapid-descent-into-alps

I would REALLY appreciate if you all would SHARE my link and UPVOTE my post on The News Hub – the way the pay structure works is I only get paid if I get LOTS of exposure. I really appreciate it! 

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